October 23, 2019 - Take alone or as part of the series - AAC for Beginning Communicators: Intervention Strategies and Team Buy-in for Empower your Classroom with Power: AAC Series

October 23, 2019 9am - 3pm

Join us as we explore AAC intervention strategies for beginning communicators and how to establish and maintain buy-in from parents and other professionals. As an increasing number of young children are prescribed high-tech speech generating devices, teachers, parents and 
clinicians are left to determine best programming practices, vocabulary selection, teaching strategies and how to gain buy-in from other team members. Many of these answers can be found in the processes of natural language development and the principles of the Language 
Acquisition through Motor Planning (LAMP) program. Current clinical practice shows that natural language development processes can be mirrored in AAC language development from the earliest cause and effect stages through the development of grammatical structures, even 
for children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders. In the earliest stages of language  development (in natural speech or using AAC), beginning communicators learn new words by connecting motor movements to their resulting auditory signal to the natural reaction they 
receive.Join us as we explore AAC intervention strategies for beginning communicators and how to establish and maintain buy-in from parents and other professionals. As an increasing number 
of young children are prescribed high-tech speech generating devices, teachers, parents and clinicians are left to determine best programming practices, vocabulary selection, teaching strategies and how to gain buy-in from other team members. Many of these answers can be found in the processes of natural language development and the principles of the Language Acquisition through Motor Planning (LAMP) program. Current clinical practice shows that  natural language development processes can be mirrored in AAC language development from the earliest cause and effect stages through the development of grammatical structures, even 
for children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders. In the earliest stages of language development (in natural speech or using AAC), beginning communicators learn new words by connecting motor movements to their resulting auditory signal to the natural reaction they 
receive.

Presenter: Lindsey Paden Cargill

Bio:  Lindsey Paden Cargill is a speech-language pathologist and the Director of Therapy Services at Bridgeway Academy, an education and therapy center for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Columbus, Ohio. Lindsey received her bachelor's and master's degrees at the University of Florida, and has worked with children with Autism Spectrum Disorders, cleft palate/craniofacial anomalies, hearing impairments, cerebral palsy, TBI and global delays in out-patient clinics, school-based settings and in the home. She is enthusiastic about applying research and best practices to the facilitation of language development through Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Lindsey has extensive presenting experience at many national and international conferences in the United States, United Kingdom and Australia. Lindsey partners with the Ohio State University’s Language Assistive Technology and Autism lab to conduct research in the area of AAC and autism; her research team has papers accepted by AJSLP and have presented at ASHA, ATIA and ISAAC.

Location

Tuscarora Intermediate Unit 11

2527 US Highway 522 South, Mc Veytown, PA 17051-9717
President's Room
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44 Reserved (6 – 50 allowed) 0 Waiting
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